Whizzz Through the World of Monet Ages 5 6 7 8 year-olds [English] (‘QUICK READS for Kids’)

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The problem is that homework is used to replace teaching. And as parents, it ruins any chance of family or personal intellectual challenge time. It might stay the same, but it's not gonna get any better. Consider moving to a city that is less competitive or sending your child to a private school, such as Woodside Priory. I say this in all sincerity, not to be rude. Or see the outcome of McGee's teacher evaluations to help teacher consistency - maybe there's hope for us. The other option is to homeschool, which is not necessarily you teaching the child.

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There are homeschooling programs where parents join their students with teachers. I know someone who is doing this precisely to avoid any homework. I have no idea where is the enforcement of their education and what they are learning. Is "homeschooling" code for "no schooling, but still legal"? Don't want to dish the homeschoolers who take it seriously, as I do know some, but I know many who just want to avoid the structure and stress. Chris Zaharias: I find it difficult to believe that any PAUSD high school student has less than 7 hours of homework per week - that's only one hour a day - it's not really possible, even with easy teachers.

I guess it's possible if the student doesn't care about grades and is sliding by with a 2. And that's where your unscientific poll is deficient - the variable of work ethic.

Paly parent observes:"The problem is that homework is used to replace teaching. And that is why it is so heavily relied upon by teachers. Relatively little effort from the teachers for a lot of payback. It is efficient from their perspective. And parents are enablers trapped in a system scrambling for college admissions. If anyone thought that there is any innovation in education - there you have it: Standards have gone up? Add homework.

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The kids will teach themselves, or the parents will, or the tutors. There is little self respect left in teaching. Maybe 1 in 3 is actually a professional who strives to really teach clearly; to help kids clear up misconceptions, to inspire learning. All the talk of reform is a joke on the kids and parents - the teachers control your grade admission to college, and they have NO accountability, so you have to teach yourself.

They are just there to do the sorting.

Mark Twain

Agree with "TheSortingHat": "the teachers control your grade admission to college, and they have NO accountability, so you have to teach yourself. I agree with Paly Parent, Mr. I know in some systems, not doing homework won't have serious consequences, but here it would. While no one is forcing anyone to do homework, the homework is a part of the educational program and if someone refuses to do it, they may well flunk out and the consequences may be that they don't get the public education they are due.

Every child is entitled to a free and appropriate public education -- it's a fundamental right that comes from the US Constitution. The Constitution does not mention homework, though, or the subject of such boundaries, except perhaps in how we might interpret the 4th Amendment. I would go further to say that I think it's unreasonable for a a school to have unfettered priority with my child's time 24 hours a day in order to receive a free and appropriate public education.

Midtown parent, I didn't realize traditionally disadvantaged groups were essentially hurt by the homework. I would love a link or further information. I was assuming that traditionally disadvantaged students would be better off for having homework because they might not have similar access to outside opportunities.

I wonder, though, if all these new computer-enabled knowledge environments are changing even that. I think back in the day, when at least in for most people there was no Internet, less access to educational reading material, less interaction with other people, homework was the best educational opportunity. There were few alternatives unless it was music lessons for those who could afford them. I was assuming the disadvantages would extend to all these new opportunities because of the digital divide, but maybe there is enough access especially with mobile computing to actually begin leveling the playing field, I don't know.

But my assumptions made me wonder about the wisdom of, essentially, a ground-breaking boundary-setting litigation over the issue, because traditionally disadvantaged groups might be hurt if homework were not an assumed part of the education but nothing was improved during the school day.


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  4. Maybe that's another circumstance that would improve by soul-searching over boundaries between school and home.

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